Series Spotlight: Cargo Literary
Default / 03/12/2020

Cargo Literary Magazine showcases personal development through travel. They do this through stunning photography, intriguing stories and evocative poetry as well as beautiful digital artwork and a book review. I recently reviewed Issue No. 14  One of the photo essays with its gorgeous photography was very moving! In this issue, one of the essays was by Fabrice Poussin, and he had offered up ten breath taking photos along with a short statement about the piece. The photo essay was about the American West. There was one other photo essay, and it was by Sherri Harvey  Digital Artwork in this issue was by Michael Paul. There was a short statement by the artist discussing his work, including how he began. He has offered up seven pieces of work collectively called Illustrations. There is another artist, Willy Vecchiato, who has shared his own work which are photos and in another class than Mr. Paul’s.  There are three Creative NonFiction stories provided in this issue. I, unfortunately, wasn’t able to read more than a few words of each pne, but I found I am wanting to go back again to complete them! The authors are Dustin Solberg, Thatcher Carter and Amanda Summer.  I love poetry, and this issue had three poems to enjoy!…

Literary Companion: The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain
Default / 31/08/2020

Twain’s “(The) Adventures of Huckleberry Finn” is notable for many things, including its unique position as the first novel to feature contemporary slang in the first person. While the book is well-known for its frequent use of an ethnic slur, to the point of having a character named “[expletive] Jim,” it also serves as a satire of the American South by comparing that region to what it was like two decades prior.  Travel fans will note that this particular story also involves a lot of adventure along the Mighty Mississippi River, the second-longest river within the United States of America (the USA’s longest river is the Missouri, by less than 200 miles). This winding river allows Finn and Jim to see many different parts of the country while sharing their insights about the world.  For those unfamiliar with the story, it begins in a fictional Missouri town, St. Petersburg. Judging from the description and geography of the area, it is likely that Twain based this town on Hannibal. After a run-in with Finn’s shiftless father, he is dragged to Illinois but escapes to Jackson’s Island along the Missisippi. While in safer surroundings, Finn runs into friends and hears that Jim wants to head…

Literary Companion: The Sun Also Rises by Ernest Hemingway
Default / 20/05/2020

Hemingway’s “The Sun Also Rises” is not only regarded as the man’s best work of literature but also his most important. It also happens to be a great piece of literature for anyone with a drive to see new places or even expatriate to a country that seems different but not to the point that it would be impossible to make a living. It also happens to be broken up into three books as Hemingway was never fond of traditional chapters.  Hemingway published this particular tale just one year after his own experiences visiting Europe. There, he witnessed the running of the bulls in Pamplona, Spain with several expatriate friends. While he had initially intended to write a book about bullfighting, something that was a great passion of his, he succumbed to his creative urges and wrote this piece of literature known as a “roman à clef.” This French term means “novel with a key” and is used to describe fiction that basically files off the serial numbers of people and places that actually existed and participated.  The protagonist of the book is Jake Barnes, an American and former soldier who is unable to engage in sex. Barnes is an expat living…